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It required just four chords. But four chords were enough for Jimmy Page. “That was something that had so much profound attitude to it,” Page told Jack White and the Edge in the 2009 documentary “It Might Get Loud.” The ’60s brought a wave of white blues — Clapton, Jeff Beck, Keith Richards — as well as the theatrics of the guitar-smashing Pete Townshend and the sonic revolutionary Hendrix. McCartney saw Hendrix play at the Bag O’Nails club in London in 1967. He thinks back on those days fondly and, in his sets today, picks up a left-handed Les Paul to jam through Hendrix’s “Foxy Lady.” “The electric guitar was new and fascinatingly exciting in a period before Jimi and immediately after,” the former Beatle says wistfully in a recent interview. “So you got loads of great players emulating guys like B.B. King and Buddy Guy, and you had a few generations there.” “Now, it’s more electronic music and kids listen differently,” McCartney says. “They don’t have guitar heroes like you and I did.” [ Meet the critic who panned Sgt. Pepper ] Nirvana was huge when the Black Keys’ Dan Auerbach, 38, was growing up. “And everybody wanted a guitar,” he says.

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